The pleasure of an image called ‘Roger Federer’ & why it ain’t over yet

fed3Wimbledon is over and hard court season has set in. The ‘write-off Roger’ brigade seems to have suffered a setback after his heroic 4th set comeback at SW19 a few weeks ago. It will resurrect itself if he fails to float above the fray in the upcoming US Open.

I am presenting excerpts from my writings for Bleacher Report and it will tell you why for fans like me, it ain’t over until the man hangs up his boots and calls it a day. Continue reading

US Open: Why Federer Will Win 18th Slam Despite Djokovic & Murray in His Way

With two strong contenders—Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray—standing in the way of the World No. 1, some are already talking about how weakened Federer’s chances are. But, should it matter to the Swiss maestro?

Well-trodden path

This is not the first time that Federer has had to wade his way through younger opponents. Leave aside players like Stepanek, Haas, Hewitt and Roddick because most other players are younger and perhaps, stronger.

For the rest of the article, click Bleacher Report

Andy Murray: Will the US Open Be His Next Eureka Moment?

Some of us can script our own life story, only a rare few of us can edit it. It is this editing in sportspersons’ lives that decides where they will eventually stand.

Federer has done it: from being a racket-smashing youngster to a man on a seemingly never-ending tennis campaign of seduction with his preternatural authority in shot-making. As for how influential he is as a human being and as an ambassador of sport, a lot of ink has already been spilled.

For the rest of the article, click Bleacher Report

Roger Federer: This Beauty Isn’t Just a Streak. It’s the Feast of the GOAT

Many prayers have been heard. Many questions have been answered.

But, of all the solace one could savor having followed the Swiss genius loyally till his seventh Wimbledon title, the record 17th Slam and his march back to No.1, a blissful break from all the bunkum about his dying legacy tops the list. Period.

For the rest of the article, click ‘Bleacher Report’.

Was Wimbledon 2010 loss a turning point in Roger Federer’s career?

Sometimes, monumental losses prove not how far apart the talents of the winner and the runner-up were, but how agonizingly close.

The 2008 Wimbledon final between Federer and Nadal proved just that. On any other day, losing a match by five points (204 of Federer’s to 209 of Nadal’s) would not have turned out to be so colossal.

But it did. Such was the game and the rivalry.

For most of his fans, I think Federer’s first French Open in 2009 almost erased the pain caused by this loss. For me, it is still the most tragic moment. I knew he would win the FO some day.

Click Bleacher Report for the rest of the article.

Is Federer the only sustainable solution to injury-ridden men’s tennis?

Some players like Djokovic and Nadal make news about pullouts as much as they do about their wins and losses.

Djokovic has been off-colours lately. We have seen him struggling hard to catch a breath especially after long rallies in recent tournaments. And then came his loss to Nadal at Monte Carlo, putting to rest arguments about the likelihood of his continuing dominance.

Click Bleacher Report for the rest of the article.

Andy Roddick: The player with great staying power

When Andy Roddick lost to Roger Federer at Wimbledon 2009 finals, he sat down dripping with sweat while Federer took a victorious stroll around the Centre Court.

Despite one of his best fights, Roddick had lost to Federer for the third time at SW19 and fourth time in a Grand Slam.

Click Bleacher Report for the rest of the article.